Last month, SNL’s Weekend Update brought on cast member Kyle Mooney as Scooter Rineholdt, a beleaguered

Last month, SNL’s Weekend Update brought on cast member Kyle Mooney as Scooter Rineholdt, a beleaguered dairy distribution executive who slings steins of cow’s milk and claims that plant-based alternatives cause children to go blind. The bit was a reaction to news that Dean Foods, a 94-year-old company and America’s longtime king of milk production, had filed for bankruptcy. According to Nielsen data supplied to CNN Business, sales of cow’s milk through the end of October this year totaled $12 billion. A hefty sum, sure, but at the same point in 2015, that number totaled $15 billion. Americans are drinking less cow’s milk than ever — for digestive reasons, to cut back on saturated fat, in alliance with the environment, as an appeal to common sense (humans are the only species that consume the milk of a different species) — and in its stead, a dizzying array of “alternative milks” have landed at cafes and grocery stores across the country. The most familiar of these to the public was long soy milk, the lone plant-based milk to brave the aughts, when plant-based milk seemed to be reserved for outcasts, a substitute used by vegans or those with allergies. But in the last decade, br...

With careful management and feed selection, owners can provide broodmares with the nutrients they needs to

With careful management and feed selection, owners can provide broodmares with the nutrients they needs to support foal growth. Here’s what our equine nutritionist recommends. Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Feb 11, 2019 | Breeding and Reproduction, Commentary, Grains, Hay, Horse Nutrition Commentary Series, Mare Care, Mare Care and Problems, Mare Nutrition, Nutrition, Nutrition Basics A.You are correct that the greatest in utero foal growth occurs during the last trimester and, traditionally, this was when managers increased the mare’s dietary intake. We realize now, however, that the tissues associated with supporting fetal growth start to develop earlier in pregnancy. Therefore, the current recommendations are to gradually increase dietary nutrients starting in the second trimester. I find that most maiden mares in good body condition don’t require a lot of additional calories during pregnancy. The extra calories they do need can often come from supplemental good-quality forage. However, it can be a challenge for some mares to consume enough forage once the foal starts to take up more space internally, and forage alone won’t provide enough key nutrients such as copper, zinc, a...