The Look Keo Blade Carbon Ceramic are high-performance pedals with a new plate design that seems

The Look Keo Blade Carbon Ceramic are high-performance pedals with a new plate design that seems to have stopped the annoying cleat rocking of older models. The ceramic bearings aren’t that noticeable on the road, but they’re smooth and holding up well. Pedals and the cleats that go with them are the unsung heroes on your bike. They rarely get serviced, yet quietly deal with you putting significant pressure through them every pedal stroke (or sometimes not so quietly – when the bearings get dry or the cleats get overly worn they can start clicking, though it’s usually blamed on the bottom bracket). So long service life to cope with this lack of attention is something I look for, along with a wide platform and secure retention. Mat tested the £155 Keo Blade Carbon pedals last year, and some of his criticisms have been addressed in this new model – as well as the addition of ceramic bearings. I can sense you all getting ready to have a right old go at the ceramic bearings in the comments, so we’ll get that out of the way first. Look claims 18% less frictional force applied to the bearing. Can you feel it? Well, spin the pedals on the crank and yes, th...

Everlane’s recycled cashmere has half the carbon footprint

An award-winning team of journalists, designers, and videographers who tell brand stories through Fast Company’s distinctive lens Is that cosy fall outfit you’re wearing contributing to climate change? I’m sorry to say that it might be. The apparel and footwear industries account for more than 8% of global emissions, which is more than all international airline flights and maritime shipping trips combined. At first glance, that’s baffling. But when you stop to think about the entire supply chain of a garment, it begins to make sense. To start with, it takes a lot of greenhouse gases to produce the raw materials that go into clothes, from raising the sheep to make wool for your sweater or cows to make leather for your boots. Then, all of these materials must be shipped around the world to be processed and manufactured in a complex global supply chain. Take brand-new cashmere, which comes from cashmere goats that graze in Mongolia. They graze on grasslands, eating away at plants that would otherwise take carbon out of the atmosphere. “Unlike another animals, cashmere goats will eat the entire grass plant, including the roots, which means the plant dies,” says Kimberley Smith...