HDCP is an anti-piracy protocol built right into the HDMI cable standard, but it doesn’t actually work very well, and breaks the viewing experience. Read on as we explain how HDCP works, why it breaks your TV, and how you can fix it. HDCP (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) is a form of Digital Rights Management (DRM). DRM protocols are designed to protect content creators and distributors against piracy. Different companies and industries use different protocols, but the basic premise is the same: DRM locks purchases you make to you and your devices. When you buy a movie on iTunes and can only play it on devices with your account, you’re experiencing DRM. Content creators and distributors should be afforded some protection, since it’s expensive to create and distribute content. The trouble is that DRM typically makes life more difficult for honest paying consumers—and in many cases outright breaks the experience—while not really doing much to deter piracy. This is the kind of trouble we run into with games that require authorization servers to run; if the company goes under so does the authorization server and suddenly the game won’t run. In the case of the HDMI standar...