For nearly a century, the St. Pierre Manufacturing Corp. has made steel products like horseshoes, tire chains and wire ropes in a facility in Worcester, Mass. Yet, despite the strong economy, St. Pierre, like many other American manufacturers, is struggling. Its problems stem from President Donald Trump’s tariffs on Chinese-made goods. The ongoing trade war “makes it a heck of a lot harder to compete,” says Peter St. Pierre, the company’s vice president of finance and operations and a grandson of founder Henry St. Pierre. Trump imposed tariffs on imported steel and aluminum more than a year ago, later adding them on an additional $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. On May 10, as negotiations on a wider deal with China faltered, he said some tariffs would increase to 25% from 10%. His rationale is twofold: dissuading Americans from buying Chinese exports is meant to put some teeth behind trade-deal talks, with the added benefit of helping domestic companies by pushing consumers to buy American. “The Tariffs can be completely avoided if you buy from a non-Tariffed Country, or you buy the product inside the USA (the best idea)” he wrote in a Twitter thread about China. “Make your ...